WELLINGTON, July 25 (Reuters) – New Zealand on Monday urged travellers returning from Indonesia to take extra precautions and in some cases to stay away from farms for at least a week to prevent a local foot and mouth outbreak that could devastate the crucial livestock industry.

Ardern said Biosecurity New Zealand, the country’s agency to keep pests and diseases out of the country, is stopping any traveller from bringing personal consignments of meat products from Indonesia and requiring them to use footmats to wash their shoes at airports when they return.

The release delays helped push up the cost of an average lot by $194,010 across the estates in Aura, Springfield and Yarrabilba in Queensland; Willowdale, Jordan Springs and Googong in NSW; and Atherstone, Woodlea and Manor Lakes in Victoria.

‘I remember I was at the announcement and I couldn’t believe it,’ recalls Fraser, who was born with six fingers on each hand and had to have an operation when he was three months old to remove the extra digits.

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At the Arena Birmingham, the 23-year-old will go for gold in the team event and the individual all-around, parallel bars and high bar, as well as having an outside shot in the pommel horse, with his Olympic champion team-mate Max Whitlock not taking part.

“A ‘scarcity trap’ occurs when supply is reduced to rebalance falling demand such that a pricing floor is established. It is reasonable to think of such actions as a market failure under standard economic assumptions.”

In the worst-case scenario, this rose to 972,382 extra admissions and 25,192 deaths, costing the NHS £5.2billion. It is most likely that, in the next 20 years, 207,597 more people than usual will be hospitalised, and top 10 7,153 will die, costing £1.1billion.

In a separate study, the Institute of Alcohol Studies (IAS) found that if drinking does not return to pre-pandemic levels, then by 2035 there will be 147,892 extra cases of nine alcohol-related diseases – such as liver cirrhosis and breast cancer – and 9,914 more premature deaths, costing the NHS £1.2billion. There are more than 200 health conditions linked to alcohol, including seven types of cancer.

Victorian Premier Daniel Andrews said he expects private developers to release lots to buyers as soon as possible, and flagged his government was open to legislative reforms to crack down on land banking.

Those classed as ‘increasing risk drinkers’ consume more than 14 units a week – the UK guidelines – but no more than 35 units per week for women and 50 for men. Meanwhile, high-risk drinkers consume even more than this.

Colin Angus, who led the University of Sheffield study, said: ‘The pandemic’s impact on our drinking behaviour is likely to cast a long shadow on our health and paint a worrying picture at a time when NHS services are already under huge pressure due to treatment backlogs.’

He said: ‘There’s a particular bump in women’s drinking at the point where they’re most likely to have been doing homeschooling during the initial lockdown.’ He said this ‘stressful’ burden may have driven some to drink more.

Researchers said that in the best-case scenario – where all drinkers return to their 2019 levels of drinking this year – there would still be an extra 42,677 hospital admissions and 1,830 deaths over 20 years due to alcohol.

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